Thursday, April 17, 2014
voodoojunkie:

kateordie:

comicsalliance:

FAKE GEEK GUYS: A MESSAGE TO MEN ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT
By Andy Khouri
“I think this woman is wrong about something on the Internet. Clearly my best course of action is to threaten her with rape.”
That’s crazy talk, right? So why does it happen all the time?
Honest question, dudes.
That women are harassed online is not news. That women in comics and the broader fandom cultures are harassed online is not news. That these women are routinely transmitted anonymous messages describing graphic sexual violence perpetrated upon them for transgressions as grave as not liking a thing… that is actually news to me, and it’s probably news to a lot of you guys reading this.
So what do we do about it?
This.
READ MORE

This is important.

If any guys are following me they should def give this a read

voodoojunkie:

kateordie:

comicsalliance:

FAKE GEEK GUYS: A MESSAGE TO MEN ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT

By Andy Khouri

“I think this woman is wrong about something on the Internet. Clearly my best course of action is to threaten her with rape.”

That’s crazy talk, right? So why does it happen all the time?

Honest question, dudes.

That women are harassed online is not news. That women in comics and the broader fandom cultures are harassed online is not news. That these women are routinely transmitted anonymous messages describing graphic sexual violence perpetrated upon them for transgressions as grave as not liking a thing… that is actually news to me, and it’s probably news to a lot of you guys reading this.

So what do we do about it?

This.

READ MORE

This is important.

If any guys are following me they should def give this a read

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Gentrification is violence. Couched in white supremacy, it is a systemic, intentional process of uprooting communities… [Its] central act of violence is one of erasure.

…“Girls,” for example, reimagines today’s Brooklyn as an entirely white community. Here’s a show that places itself in the epicenter of a gentrifying city with gentrifiers for characters – it is essentially a show about gentrification that refuses to address gentrification. After critics lambasted Season 1 for its lack of diversity, the show brought in Donald Glover to play a black Republican and still managed to avoid the more pressing and relevant question of displacement and racial disparity that the characters are, despite their self-absorption, deeply complicit with. What’s especially frustrating about “Girls” not only dodging the topic entirely but pushing back – often with snark and defensiveness against calls for more diversity – is that it’s a show that seems to want to bring a more nuanced take on the complexities of modern life.

In an appallingly overwritten New York magazine article with the (I guess) provocative title “Is Gentrification All Bad?,” Justin Davidson imagines a first wave of gentrifiers much the way I’ve heard it described again and again: “A trickle of impecunious artists hungry for space and light.” This is the standard, “first it was the artists” narrative of gentrification, albeit a little spruced up, and the unspoken but the understood word here is “white.” Because, really, there have always been artists in the hood. They aren’t necessarily recognized by the academy or using trust funds supplementing coffee shop tips to fund their artistic careers, but they are still, in fact, artists. The presumptive, unspoken “white” in the first round of artists gentrification narrative is itself an erasure of these artists of color.

Gentrification’s insidious violence: The truth about American cities | Salon  (via america-wakiewakie)
pheberoni:

yeha

pheberoni:

yeha

Saturday, April 12, 2014 Thursday, April 10, 2014

animatorsjourney:

This last week, we did an exercise that is very basic… but I was surprised at how much it helped.  Anyone who has done a drawing class has broken the object they’re drawing down into the basic shapes, and gone from there.  To be honest, I didn’t think it would help that much, and I was even more terrified as we had to draw from a female model which I seem to be having a lot of trouble drawing. 

I did a quick gesture to get an idea of the body position, made the body of cubes and cylinders, and combined them all… and I wasn’t dissatisfied!  It was the fastest I had ever drawn a person, much less a female, and I didn’t want to pull out my hair!  It was such a satisfying feeling!  It was the encouragement I needed to keep going.

racconconnoisseur:

pinuparena:

"Was discussing Zelda vs Peach today with a friend. They were my fave characters in Super Smash. I was trying to explain the subtlety of design and how you can express a lot about a character even before you seen how they behave. I did a quick redesign to illustrate my point. Peach is an extrovert, so she’s up and out. Round against flat, with a little bounce thrown in. Zelda on the other hand is down and in. She is long and lean, with a much narrower silhouette. She has a lot more substance than Peach, so her clothes are highly decorated, plus a fair bit of her face is obstructed by her hair. There are a few more subtleties thrown in as well. Have fun looking for them"
By Daemion Elias

Nailed it.

racconconnoisseur:

pinuparena:

"Was discussing Zelda vs Peach today with a friend. They were my fave characters in Super Smash. I was trying to explain the subtlety of design and how you can express a lot about a character even before you seen how they behave. I did a quick redesign to illustrate my point. Peach is an extrovert, so she’s up and out. Round against flat, with a little bounce thrown in. Zelda on the other hand is down and in. She is long and lean, with a much narrower silhouette. She has a lot more substance than Peach, so her clothes are highly decorated, plus a fair bit of her face is obstructed by her hair. There are a few more subtleties thrown in as well. Have fun looking for them"

By Daemion Elias

Nailed it.

Urgent security update

staff:

Bad news. A major vulnerability, known as “Heartbleed,” has been disclosed for the technology that powers encryption across the majority of the internet. That includes Tumblr.

We have no evidence of any breach and, like most networks, our team took immediate action to fix the issue.

But this still means that the little lock icon (HTTPS) we all trusted to keep our passwords, personal emails, and credit cards safe, was actually making all that private information accessible to anyone who knew about the exploit.

This might be a good day to call in sick and take some time to change your passwords everywhere—especially your high-security services like email, file storage, and banking, which may have been compromised by this bug.

You’ll be hearing more in the news over the coming days. Take care.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
sparklermonthly:

kstipetic:

HI RES VERSION HERE
Some people were asking to see my process, so here’s how it looked when I was thumbnailing chapter Tuesday.When I first started drawing comics, I wasn’t satisfied with the way the panels flowed together. I wanted to convey a continuous, cinematic feeling with my art and also avoid drawing too many “talking heads” shots. This is the method I developed for myself. You can use it too, if you like.
First make a bunch of boxes the same size on their own layer. These represent the comic pages.
Then I draw ideas for different camera angles and panel progressions in the blank space between the boxes. I erase of lot of stuff that doesn’t work, but you can still see there are many shots that didn’t make it into the final draft of the comic.
Then I arrange the shots into the boxes. Lots of copy/pasting. I change the order and fill in spots where it’s just a talking head.
If I get stuck, I just leave the space blank and move on. Or draw something that I know I’ll erase later.
Next, I read over the thumbnails in order, saying the dialog to myself in my head. Is it smooth? Does it give the right feeling? After reading it back, I can usually see what should go in the blank spaces that I left before.
For me, this is by far the most mentally intense stage of drawing comics. A day of thumbnailing leaves me completely drained. But after this, drawing the pages is mostly auto-pilot.

If anyone hasn’t read 14 Nights, they should—it’s terrific (albeit NSFW). And this is such neat insight into the artistic process! Thumbs are so important!! 

sparklermonthly:

kstipetic:

HI RES VERSION HERE

Some people were asking to see my process, so here’s how it looked when I was thumbnailing chapter Tuesday.

When I first started drawing comics, I wasn’t satisfied with the way the panels flowed together. I wanted to convey a continuous, cinematic feeling with my art and also avoid drawing too many “talking heads” shots. This is the method I developed for myself. You can use it too, if you like.

  • First make a bunch of boxes the same size on their own layer. These represent the comic pages.
  • Then I draw ideas for different camera angles and panel progressions in the blank space between the boxes. I erase of lot of stuff that doesn’t work, but you can still see there are many shots that didn’t make it into the final draft of the comic.
  • Then I arrange the shots into the boxes. Lots of copy/pasting. I change the order and fill in spots where it’s just a talking head.
  • If I get stuck, I just leave the space blank and move on. Or draw something that I know I’ll erase later.
  • Next, I read over the thumbnails in order, saying the dialog to myself in my head. Is it smooth? Does it give the right feeling? After reading it back, I can usually see what should go in the blank spaces that I left before.


For me, this is by far the most mentally intense stage of drawing comics. A day of thumbnailing leaves me completely drained. But after this, drawing the pages is mostly auto-pilot.

If anyone hasn’t read 14 Nights, they should—it’s terrific (albeit NSFW). And this is such neat insight into the artistic process! Thumbs are so important!! 

Anonymous asked: I was wondering, when you're designing a character, what is your thought process like? Are there certain things you keep in mind, or elements that you're trying to hit when drawing? All your characters have a vibrancy and life to them - what do you think helps achieve that? Your work is so gorgeous and I just want to be able to pick at your brain for a bit haha.

zakeno:

I usually am keeping two big things in mind when designing a character: 1.) the character’s personality and 2.) big shapes that support that. 

Some great examples of character-based drawings are these Sherman sketches by Shane Prigmore! You can see it isn’t necessarily just about posing the character like… looking excited, if they’re excitable, but also to be able to think of things they’d actually do. Like put a burning match in their mouth:


But shapes that support a character’s personality are really important too! I personally think The Incredibles is one of the most well-designed movies in term of strong shapes, here’s a couple great examples of Edna designs:

The one at the top is about as basic as you can get, but it shows a real streamline of the shape language in her final design. They all support what sort of character she is, too: Large room for pushed expressions, but simple modern shapes, and very short. So goooood! Mr. Incredible is a great design, too, since he has the shapes of a super buff hella strong man (big shoulders, kinda an upside-down triangle overall) but also the shapes of a dude in the middle of a midlife crisis (slouching posture, and a protruding gut). As you can see, shapes in character design are just as important as really letting the character’s personality shine through!

Hope that helps!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less AnatomyI’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - More Acting Less Anatomy

I’ve received a few message asking me how to draw simple generic characters (male, female) for story boarding, and what to do when there’s no character design. I will go over all that stuff, but I need to emphasize something first. I used to be obsessed with muscles and specific anatomy when I was drawing anything. Thanks to 90s superhero comic books and raging hormones, it kept me from embracing the storytelling aspect of sketching. Even later on in art school, I would spend WAY took much time on getting that perfect line quality. Animation Storyboarding squashed most of those inclinations out of me, and that’s good. I need to confess that I almost caved in and “cleaned up” the drawings on this page. This is how I draw when do a “first pass” or just trying to find ideas. That way, I don’t lose the energy or feel of my first instinct when approaching a sequence. Here’s something you’ll hear many times if you hang around story people: “It’s not about pretty drawings.” I agree and disagree to a certain extent, but the sentiment is right. It’s about telling a story and not letting other things (like lines, musculature, clothing, etc.) get in the way of doing so clearly.

Once again, message me if you have requests for the next installments.

Norm

harteus:

i sure as hell hope this one is a little more informative than the nose tutorial. beware of really bad handwriting and possible grammar mistakes.

i was asked to make an eye tut as well. you can find the nose tut right here; CLICK YO

i really hope i’ll be able to help at least a bit! cheers xxx

bobbycaputo:

HumanaePortraits Match People of Different Ethnicities With Their Pantone Color

Brazilian fine art photographer Angelica Dass‘ series Humanae identifies portrait subjects from around the world using the Pantone color system. Using an 11×11 pixel swatch from her subjects’ faces, Dass matches them to corresponding Pantone colors, creating an abundant and unique catalog of skin tones that reflects the world’s diversity beyond the categorizations we have long been confined to. We recently asked her more about the ongoing project.

k-fgt asked: I'm having a hard time drawing different glasses from different angles, sort of like a 3/4 view, could you help me with that ?

kelpls:

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

hope that helps! AND IF u need more help, LOOK FOR SOME GLASSES WEARING PEOPLE n snap their photos 

fablepaint:

Note that in all stages until the last, the dinosaur believes food equals chair.

(Source: raattles)